Book Tour Schedule

“Bringing Columbia Home” was officially released today! Demand has been unexpectedly high. Our publisher has already ordered a second printing!

Mike and I have several busy weeks ahead of us as we commemorate the crew of STS-107  and celebrate the accomplishments of the 25,000 Americans who worked to recover Columbia.

Here’s where we’ll be in the coming weeks. Please come by and say hi if you’re nearby!

Thursday, January 25: NASA Day of Remembrance. Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. Program begins in the education center at 10:00 and moves to the Space Mirror at 11:00.

Friday, January 26: NASA Apollo-Challenger-Columbia Lessons Learned Program panel, “Columbia: Lessons and Legends of Recovery.” Kennedy Space Center Training Auditorium, 1:00-3:00. Open to KSC-badged personnel only.

Saturday, January 27: Wreath-laying, Sand Point Park, Titusville, 10:00 a.m. – 11:00. Book signing afterward at the American Space Museum, 308 Pine St, Titusville. We will have a limited number of books for purchase (onsite sales benefit the museum). Bring a book of your own and we will sign it free of charge. Signed and personalized book plates will also be available.

Monday, January 29: Live interview with Brian Freeman on “True Story” (http://tobtr.com/10519951) at 8:30 p.m. EST.

Wednesday, January 31: Panel discussion at Johnson Space Center with Mike and Wayne Hale, 8:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. CST. Open to JSC-badged personnel only. Book signing immediately afterward.

Thursday, February 1: Memorial service at 7:45 a.m. CST, followed by book signings and discussions at the Remembering Columbia Museum, 375 Sabine St., Hemphill, Texas.

Saturday, February 3: Presentation to Space Exploration Educators Conference, Space Center Theater, JSC, 3:30 – 4:30 p.m. Book signing at the Space Center Houston retail store immediately afterward.

Sunday, February 11: Book signing at the National Air and Space Museum’s Udvar-Hazy Center, 14390 Air and Space Museum Parkway, Chantilly, Virginia. 12:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. EST.

Monday, February 12: “What’s New in Aerospace” program, National Air & Space Museum DC building (Independence Ave. at 6th St. SW, Washington DC) in the  ‘Moving Beyond Earth’ gallery, 2:00-2:30 CST. Details at https://airandspace.si.edu/events/story-behind-space-shuttle-columbia-recovery-mission. Live webcast.

Thursday, February 15: Book signing and discussion at The Great Outdoors, Titusville, Florida, 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. EST. (Mike only)

Author: Jonathan Ward

Jonathan Ward is an author of books on the history of American manned spaceflight. He also serves as an adjunct executive coach at the Center for Creative Leadership.

6 thoughts on “Book Tour Schedule”

  1. I ordered Bringing Columbia Home through Amazon.com and received it about a week ago. This book is so powerful, I’m only about half through but have had to put down several times. All I could do was cry. I live 56 miles from Hemphill and living in Kirbyville. I was glued to my TV for hours. Such a tragedy for NASA and the Astronauts that died that February day. I plan to be at the book signing.

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    1. Thank you so much, Mary, for taking the time to write. Those were very intense and trying times for sure. Mike and I hope to meet you in Hemphill this week and thank you in person for your support.

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  2. I just finished Bringing Columbia Home and am still caught up in that world. It was staggering to realize the tremendous effort that went on while the rest of the world mourned.

    Several years ago, I stood before the Discovery in DC and marveled at its size, its scars, the numbers on every tile. I knew that the wing on the Columbia had been destroyed, and looked at her sister’s wing carefully. It’s almost inconceivable that a mere chunk of foam could doom the flight of that monster bird, but you’ve laid out everything in comprehensible fashion that’s accessible to the average Joe.

    Thank you for that. Thank you for giving her and her passengers a voice. It’s heartening to know that those astronauts were still working the systems for a solution as long as they could, and that they taught irreplaceable lessons for future flights.

    Good work was done then and this book is outstanding!

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    1. Thank you, Lyn. I had similar thoughts standing next to Discovery this week. That such a mighty ship could be brought down by a chunk of foam is simply inconceivable. You know it happened, but the relative scale of things seems so ridiculously off.

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