The Columbia Debris Loan Program

It’s been a while since I posted a new blog. No excuses, just apologies. Hurricane Irma certainly did a number on Florida, and all us residents are still dealing with the aftermath.

On a recent visit to the Columbia Preservation Room in the VAB (to show the debris to some ULA employees), Mike Ciannilli updated us on the continuing success of the debris loan program with some truly amazing statistics. I want to share his success with you here, but first please allow me some personal reflections.

Leinbach Kennedy Thurston unveil plaque 02-01-04
From left, Mike Leinbach, KSC Center Director Jim Kennedy, and Scott Thurston unveil the plaque commemorating the Columbia PReservation Office on January 29, 2004. (NASA photo)

When the reconstruction team proposed studying Columbia vs burying it (à la Challenger), we could not possibly have dreamed how successful and inspiring the outcome would be. With Administrator O’Keefe’s full support and encouragement, Scott Thurston crafted an in-depth concept for the program, wrote and released a Request for Information to industry to judge interest—and the rest, as they say, is history. THANKS, Scott.

Melroy and Mangiacapra 02-01-04
Astronaut Pam Melroy, who led the crew module reconstruction effort, with Amy Mangiacapra at the dedication of the Columbia Preservation Office on January 29, 2004. (NASA photo)

Once we knew definitively studying the debris was a good idea, the Columbia Preservation Office was officially dedicated (on the first anniversary of the accident) in its new home on the 16th floor of A Tower of the VAB. United Space Alliance’s Amy Mangiacapra was the first curator and held the position for 10 years. Alone, she cared for the debris, collected pieces requested for study, managed the room, escorted visitors, dealt with ceiling leaks, swept the floors, and did everything/anything required. She was Columbia’s caretaker, and she did it in a manner beyond what she (and we) considered a job. Columbia was her “work child”. Amazing. THANKS, Amy.

NASA created a full-time position for the office in 2014. Mike Ciannilli became the first NASA curator, and by any measure, is the perfect person to take care of Columbia following Amy. (As with the astronauts, we like to give each other nicknames. Because Mike bears a resemblance to “Chachi” Happy Days, we lovingly refer to him as “Chachi” or “Chach.”)

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Mike Ciannilli at the entrance to the Columbia Preservation Office in the VAB. (Jonathan Ward photo)

Not only does Chach administer the debris loan program, but under his leadership and that of KSC Center Director Bob Cabana, the Forever Remembered memorial was opened in the Atlantis building at the KSC Visitor Complex. Columbia’s forward window frames are in a display case for everyone to see and contemplate. They also got the Challenger families to embrace the concept, with the large sidewall piece of Challenger now occupying an adjacent case. Moreover, with the vision of the greater good that can come from studying past failures, in 2016 Mike created the “Apollo Challenger Columbia Lessons Learned Program,” bringing those hard-taught lessons to the workforce and others in hopes they won’t be repeated ever again. GREAT JOB, Chachi.

Finally, the statistics Chach and all of us are so proud to share: To date some 260 pieces of Columbia have been lent to academia and industry for study. As I write this, 12 pieces weighing over 1000 pounds are being studied to advance the understanding in how different materials and structures behave when subjected to the extreme conditions of hypersonic re-entry. And of particular pride, there are three individuals who used Columbia in their PhD dissertations in achieving the highest scholastic degrees in engineering and material science. That’s what I call success!!!!!!

In a very real sense Columbia continues her mission….

Author: Mike Leinbach

Mike was the final Space Shuttle Launch Director at NASA's John F. Kennedy Space Center. He led the launch team for all Shuttle missions from August 2000 to the end of the program in 2011, giving the final "go" for every launch.

4 thoughts on “The Columbia Debris Loan Program”

  1. As an aerospace electrical installer working for Rockwell and Boeing in Palmdale, CA, I spent thousands of hours inside Columbia. My co-workers and I loved our work and loved the orbiters…good to know the love lives on in those preserving the legacy.

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  2. Mike, thanks for sharing. Hope you are well. I used to make it a point to shake your hand at the SLF for each shuttle landing we supported. Kyle Mallory KSC Life Support Technician 1989-Present

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    1. Hi Kyle,
      I remember you very well. Thx for the note. All is good in scottsmoor! And I’ll look into the PayPal thing tonight. Hope to see you at a book signing next January at the Center!

      Like

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